Methadone FAQ

How do I know if methadone is right for me?

The prescription medication methadone is a safe option for treating opioid addiction, and is commonly used within medication assisted treatment programs. Methadone obtained approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) after research determined that it is effective in aiding individuals in recovering from addictions to substances like morphine, prescription pain medications, and heroin. When used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan, methadone is able to stop the onset of powerful cravings, as well as the intensity of withdrawal symptoms that develop once an individual stops his or her abuse of opioids.

If you or someone you care about desires to obtain medication assisted treatment that includes the use of methadone, speak with a treatment provider to decide if this plan of action is best for you or your loved one. There are a number of other medication options that exist within medication assisted treatment programs. Therefore, by working with your treatment provider, you can determine if methadone or another medication is right for you or your loved one.

Can I become addicted to methadone?

Yes, methadone is a controlled substance, meaning that it holds potential for abuse. However, when utilized within a medication assisted treatment program, certified professionals can monitor each patient’s use of methadone so that he or she does not abuse this medication. In addition, medication assisted treatment programs require patients come to the center on a daily basis to obtain their dosage of methadone, which further reduces the risk of abuse.

Will methadone show up on a drug screening?

If an individual is asked to complete a drug screen while taking methadone, he or she will not test positive for this medication. Only a special type of drug test will be able to detect this medication. However, if an individual is abusing other licit or illicit substances, he or she will test positive for those.

How long will I need to be on methadone?

The period of time that you will spend on methadone will depend on your own individual needs. While some individuals only take methadone for a short period of time, others take it for longer.

If you or someone you love is considering the use of methadone to help treat an opioid addiction, speak with a treatment provider to determine how long you might remain on this medication.

Does methadone interact with other drugs or medications?

If an individual is consuming any other prescription medications for physical or psychological reasons, he or she should make his or her treatment provider aware prior to starting on methadone. Methadone does have the potential to cause unfavorable interactions. Therefore, it is always smart to discuss all medications being taken with a treatment provider to ensure the safety and effectiveness of all medications being consumed. In addition, keep in mind that the use of other opioids or alcohol while taking methadone is not recommended.

What if I no longer wish to take methadone? Can I stop or switch to a different medication?

While some individuals will keep taking methadone for the long-term, each person who is consuming this medication is not required to take it for an extended period of time. Each individual can experience withdrawal symptoms when stopping the use of methadone. Therefore, it is important to wean off of this medication with the help of a treatment provider who can determine the most appropriate dosages to do so. In addition, if a patient is interested in starting on a new medication, he or she can discuss this decision with his or her provider.

What is the cost of methadone treatment?

The treatment we provide at Baton Rouge Comprehensive Treatment Center is customized to meet the unique needs of each patient who obtains services from us. Therefore, the cost of care can vary due to the type of medication being obtained, the services received, and the method of payment.

If you or someone you care for wants to learn more about the possible cost of treatment at Baton Rouge Comprehensive Treatment Center, please contact one of our compassionate intake specialists today.

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